Why Driving Sucks

I could write a whole lot more about my job at the end of my first week, but I have more interest in talking about what happens before and after that work.

I have time-shifted, so I drive 6:30am – 7:30am and then 4:00pm – 5:00pm.
This is as close as I think I’ll get to the optimistic Google estimate of 53 minutes.
And that’s okay.

For the past eternity, my 5-10 minute commute exposes me to a bad driver or two every once in a while. With a daily 60 minute commute each way, every day is my “lucky” day. And I wanted to just record some of these blessings so I do not forget when the time comes to gripe about occasional public-transport mishaps.

Ending Lanes – there are a couple of places on my commute where 2 lanes merge into 1, with the left lane disappearing. Most drivers are perfectly polite and do not push in all the way at the end of the merging lane. Sadly, when they do, they merge in as little distance as possible, which usually encourages the small minority to overtake in the left lane… and push in at the very front, which then slows down the right lane even more, encouraging even more assh*les to push in front. Every once in a while you’ll even have someone ducking from the right lane into the left, push to the front and re-merge… because… entitlement.

This is actually the easiest to fix, and when I find myself in the left lane, I start indicating to merge early and when a space opens up, I move over half-way to claim the spot while keeping the left lane blocked. If this feels awkward, indicating and just keeping pace with the open space will work too. This usually makes both lanes flow better because now there aren’t any pushing-in cars causing confusion and uncertainty to the drivers at the end of the merge.

Overtaking Lanes – there is a long windy single-lane stretch in my commute, which occasionally widens to 2 lanes for a stretch to allow overtaking before merging back together. It is inevitable on the single-lane portions to get stuck behind a car going below the speed limit. On a 100km/h stretch there’ll be a car doing 90km/h. I wait patiently. Then the overtaking lane comes. I get into the second lane and speed up to 105km/h to get past quickly… and now suddenly the granny turns into Taz, going 108km/h and pulling away from me!?

Theoretically this can be overcome by speeding up till you inevitably go faster, but I don’t really want to see how far that game of chicken would take me. I do not know why people do this. It is anti-social… if you know the car behind you for the last 5km clearly wanted to go faster than you are going, can you not hold back when the overtaking lane comes around? Heck, slow down to 80km/h briefly to make it easier, and then go back to 90km/h; everyone’s happy!

Hanging Right – this is a variant of the last one… most of the way to work doesn’t exceed 2 lanes. The slow traffic is on the left. The fast traffic is on the right. Everyone thinks they are fast traffic. They want to go faster than the slow car they are behind. 85km/h on a 100km/h stretch!? No way! So, they pull in front of me to overtake… at 90km/h… for ki-lo-me-tres.

When I notice a fast driver approaching behind me, I find a way to get back into the left lane, even if I still want to get back in the right lane right afterwards to keep overtaking myself. Even if the car coming up is doing an illegal 120km/h, because I’m not the Police, and I’m not here to stop them from doing anything wrong. It’s usually best to have extreme speeders and Tetris drivers as far away as possible anyway.

Anyway,…
… Future-Jerry…
… That train you are hating so much right now, is really not so bad…
… It is usually moving. It isn’t beholden to the whims of other traffic…
… It may be a bit full, but you can read a book and be blissfully ignorant of those few idiots on the road…

Starting at Campaign Monitor

Commute

I made the right call when I was first offered the job late 2013; that is not to say that there is anything wrong with the job per-se, because Campaign Monitor has already proven an awesome place to work. The commute would have killed me 6 months in.

Tuesday - fresh muffins with breakfast
Tuesday – fresh muffins with breakfast

On Monday morning, I made it from home to work in 70 minutes, door to door. Not bad, but not quite the 60 minutes I thought achievable. My manager suggested I try a different route home, which due to evening traffic also came to 70 minutes, and sadly a missed Pilates class.

Then this morning, Google told me to expect 1h42m, to which I scoffed “No Way”.
Alas, “Yes Way”… multiple incidents and accidents, hints and allegations later, 90 minutes door-to-door.

I am somewhat hopeful after a 60-minute commute this afternoon that I can fine-tune this a little further for the next 4 weeks after which the office will move to a gorgeous new CBD location. I am considering waking up at the not-a-real-time of 6:30am so that I can start early, finish early, and hopefully mostly avoid the traffic both ways.

A small limited-duration sacrifice to the sleep gods may be warranted. And limiting my gym classes to Tuesday evening and the weekend for now.

Food

This job comes with breakfast and lunch included.

And not just something quickly thrown-together either. The Three Chefs start their day at 7am, first to make breakfast and coffee orders for 8:30am, then to make lunch for 12:30pm, and finally an afternoon snack and coffee at 2:30pm.

Tuesdays' menu - I can still smell the lamb ribs on my t-shirt
Tuesdays’ menu – I can still smell the lamb ribs on my t-shirt

It’s definitely better fare than I’d be able to buy myself for an average $10, and it’s not costing me anything. It’s also a great time to sit down and chat with co-workers. Sadly I am horrendous with names, and I’m sure I’ll have to be reminded for a while longer… but it’s a great way to get to know my coworkers.

There is an internal web page where the menu for the week is published, and from what I understand the chefs do not like repeating themselves, so I am looking forward to never having the same lunch again. Also, probably healthier than I’d otherwise eat (mostly).

Learning Curve

Getting started is always a bit intimidating, when you come in feeling like you know nothing. The Engineering department has a buddy system in place though, so I have someone to ask when I need to figure something out.

There have been a few false starts where I needed a hand, but otherwise, the internal Wiki is amazingly comprehensive. I have learned an awful lot already in only two days from just poking around.

DiSC - 6515 - Creative (apparently!)
DiSC – 6515 – Creative (apparently!)

Today I had my first one-on-one with my team lead. Having used Manager Tools myself, I already knew what to expect. And I had seen many staff with DiSC profiles displayed in their windows, so I asked if I should get one of those done as well.

“Oh sure, there is a Wiki page, and here are the credit card details… just make sure you send an invoice to myself and the accountant when you’ve bought something.”

*blink* … no red tape indeed!

Culture

Which brings me to CM culture.

Friendly and relaxed does not even begin to describe it. “We’re all smart adults here” might as well be the company motto. The change feels a little disorienting to me, but I’m sure I will adapt quickly enough.

Dress code is: “whatever you are comfortable in” (within reason, of course, see “smart adult” above), but there are plenty of staff in t-shirts, shorts and no-shoes.

Tomorrow's Lunch - Sous Vide chicken.
Tomorrow’s Lunch – Sous Vide chicken.

I have been invited to try ping-pong, XBox, after-work trainer sessions… So far, I have politely declined while I get my bearings a bit more and work out my commute and sleep patterns.

But I already know, I’m right at home.

Day 48 – Podcasts

I was completely stuck for something to write about today. Nothing I had done seemed at all interesting and worthy of a post. I was almost resigned to the fact I was going to have to write the dullest post yet.

And then it occurred to me that I listen to my podcasts when I commute. I used to have a longer list of subscriptions in my DoubleTwist on my Android, but I found some although interesting enough were just not worth the time investment.

Currently my subscription-list consists of the following:

  • The Nerdist: Chris Hardwick’s podcast interviews Nerd icons across the spectrum. Often funny, sometimes rude, always worth listening to
  • 99% Invisible: a very recent addition on design; so far the signs are good for this being a keeper
  • Common Sense with Dan Carlin: an almost-weekly independent’s view on American and global politics
  • Dan Carlin’s Hardcore History: a ready-when-it-is-ready podcast using 4 hour episodes to dig deep into historical topics
  • Hanselminutes: a podcast by Scott Hanselman on a range of programming topics, very large back-catalogue of episodes to choose from
  • Savage Love Podcast: Dan Savage gives a broad mix of acerbic and insightful relationship advice to callers… warning to the intolerant or easily icked – he covers everything and anything
  • TEDTalks: often inspiring talks (video) on topics from architecture to nature and science to religion and anything and everything else
  • This American Life: long-running radio show where each episode has a theme, and consists of a variety of stories on that theme… both factual and fictional… touching and hard-hitting
  • This Developer’s Life: inspired by This American Life’s format, and created in collaboration by Rob Conery and Scott Hanselman on topics in software development
  • Writing Excuses: a weekly podcast that has run since early 2008 on topics surrounding writing by Brandon Sanderson, Howard Tayler, Dan Wells and Mary Robinette Kowal

If you have any other quality podcast recommendations, please feel free to leave me a comment!